Stash Enjoyment 2021 – June Update

The top of a china hutch is shown packed full of many skeins of yarn in varying colors

If this is the first post you’re seeing about my goals to work from stash and buy less new yarn for the year of 2021, please check out the Stash Enjoyment 2021 Introductory Post, or search for “Stash Enjoyment” in the search bar of this website.

The photo above is a quick snap of what currently comprises about 20% of my stash. We’ve all acknowledged it’s a tad ridiculous, yes?

How has the year gone so far?
January-February were pretty good, March-April I didn’t track much (at all) since I moved fairly suddenly in the middle of March. I fully admit to stress buying around the time of the move, and went back to my old habits a bit – “hey, that’s pretty! Sold.”

Overall, for the year of 2021 I’m currently at -1,120.5 yds of yardage for the year. Does that mean that’s all I’ve used? No, it just means in general I’m buying slightly less than I’m using.. but only slightly instead of significantly as I’d planned. So far I’ve used about 9,300 yds of yarn this year, which is on par with my expectations. I’ve estimated that I use 15,000-25,000 yds of yarn per year, depending on the year and how good I get at finishing projects.

Does that mean this year is a wash?
Nope! Here’s some tangible progress for you:
1. I finished my oldest WIP a couple days ago!
A neon mint green sock with cabling resembling a beehive is on Ruth's left foot. The cabling wraps around the leg and down the foot.
There’s a second one of these – a more full post is coming; these are Beeswax Socks that I started in May of 2020 and just finished two days ago (June 27, 2021). I’m thrilled that my longest-standing WIP (not counting scrappy projects) is now from August of 2020! I hope that by the end of the year I will have completed all outstanding projects with the exception of the ongoing scrappy blankets I’m working on.

2. I haven’t bought any yarn in 1 month, 1 week, and 1 day as of today. I have a little countdown/up app on my phone and I’m enjoying seeing the number go up! The only exception I’ve made is that I have a standing sock-set subscription to Yarnaceous that I already authorized through the end of 2021. So, while that’s technically about 500 yds in per month, I don’t count it as buying because I’m not impulsively seeing it and buying it on a whim.

3. I’ve been working on my scrappy projects. Since I don’t count yardage until projects are completed, my scrap blankets will have HUGE yardage deficits for me – I just don’t get to count them yet.
4 granny squares lie on a stone background. They vary signifcantly in color
This is my new “Stash Enjoyment” blanket square; each square uses approximately 34g of yarn – whether dk or fingering weight held double. So, with 10 squares I’ve got 335 yds of yarn out so far when this is complete. I think I’m shooting for a 64 square blanket (8×8) or possibly 80 squares (8×10), so I’m somewhere between 10-15% complete with this project. If you want the pattern for this, check out the Stash Enjoyment Pattern Post!

4. I’m trying new things!
A crochet bralette lies on a picnic table. The cups are a variegated pink, orange, red; the band is a light gray in an arrow pattern.
This is my first (and failed) attempt at crocheting a bralette! I thought it would be fun to try my hand at designing (for myself) a comfy cotton bralette for summer. This one took me only 1 day, including lots of frogging, and I know exactly what I did wrong and how I’ll change it for the next one. That’s a win! Plus, it used stash 🙂

Plans for the rest of the year:

  1.  Finish up all active WIPS before the end of the year. Scrap blankets may be an exception if needed. Current active WIPS are (from oldest to newest):
    1. Malthinae Mitts
    2. Socks for my 5 year old (these may get frogged and re-started. I think his feet are already too big for the size I started!)
    3. Alpaca Shawl design (also may be frogged)
    4. Sock Madness Qualifier Socks (1 complete, second one just needs the heel turn and foot)
    5. “Ice Cream for Breakfast” shawl design
    6. Salt & Honey Slouch (I hope to finish this quickly for the end of the Uplift Make Along!)
    7. “Boob Window” by Majestich Designs – Just needs the body completed. Maybe 10″ more of 1×1 ribbing?
    8. Tapestry Crochet Handprint Bag (base is done, body needs to be completed)
    9. Louisette Socks for my mommy! (Just started today, I’m hoping to whip them out quickly)

If I remember to, I want to come back and cross these projects off as I get them finished. I’m also planning on a 2:1 project ratio for the second half of the year, if possible. That means I need to finish or frog 2 projects for each new 1 I want to cast on.

Yarn Buying Plans for the rest of 2021
I’d like to keep it to just the Yarnaceous subscription. With all the projects and designs I have to finish, plus my stash goals, I don’t really see a reason why I would need to buy any yarn. Right now when I see something pretty I ask myself “what would you use it for and how quickly could you actually use it?”
If the answer is not that I would cast it on right away for a necessary project, I move on and remind myself that my non-buying countdown currently has over a month on it and I don’t really want it to start over from zero!

If you’re working from stash this year, how’s it going for you? Are you enjoying the process of creating/buying more thoughtfully, or did you miss the mark a little bit like I did?

Remember that we’re all growing and changing people – don’t beat yourself up if you didn’t hit one of your goals; use that miss as a way to re-assess what a realistic goal is for you. Did you miss one that was attainable by not sticking to your plan, or did you plan something that wasn’t reasonable for you right now?

❤ Ruth

Uplift Make Along June/July Prize Sponsors

It’s just about the end of the Uplift Make Along, a three month event (which is extending a tad) created to support and bring visibility to designers who aren’t “famous” (yet!) in the fiber arts design community.

Some wonderful makers have generously donated prizes for the event participants (which could include you) – so here they are!

Winners for these prizes will be selected from posts made during the month of June and the first 2 weeks of July using the “Finished Object” topic tag in the Mighty Network for the Uplift Makealong as well as from FOs posted with the #UpliftMakeAlong hashtag on Instagram. A random number generator is used to select winners, and they are then matched with prizes that fit the craft they use and the location they are in.

Please check out the prize sponsors below – check out their shops too if you just can’t wait to see if you won the prize!


Crochet Luna creates beautiful, fun, and sassy pins as well as hand dyed yarn, crochet patterns, and other fun fiber arts swag!

Claudia has generously donated a 4-pack of pin-back buttons currently available in the CrochetLuna Etsy shop! If you love fun pins like the ones in the photo, be sure to check out Claudia’s shop here: CrochetLuna Etsy Shop and Instagram here: Crochet Luna on Instagram

(Ships Worldwide)


Voie de Vie
design + craft = an artful way of life

Denise has donated a variety of prizes, both last month and for this month as well.

First up is a canvas tote bag with some gorgeous Voie de Vie yarn on it. Check out this beautiful photo Denise sent:
skeins of brightly colored yarn are piled on a wooden surface

Check out the Voie de Vie Big Cartel shop here for more yarns, totes, art boxes, subscription clubs, and more: Voie de Vie Big Cartel You’ll also want to follow on Instagram to see all the cool new colors and products Denise creates: @denisevoiedevie

Thank you for your generosity and participation in the event, Denise!

(Ships Worldwide)


Anne Beady Design

Anne is offering this absolutely adorable project bag + a knitting pattern of the winner’s choice from her Etsy shop.

Knitting project bag with baby koalas on it. The accent of the bag is a terra-cotta color, knitting is shown poking out of the bag with a cup of coffee in the bottom right hand corner

How cute are these tiny koalas? If you can’t wait to find out if you are the winner, make sure you go check out Anne’s shop and see her other equally adorable project bags!
Click here to visit Anne’s shop, and visit her Instagram here: @AmBeady

(Ships to USA only)


Studio TwentyTwo & Voie de Vie Yarns

Janet from Studio TwentyTwo & Denise from Voie de Vie Yarns have teamed up to bring you another prize! Janet is offering a copy of one of her crochet patterns (available on Ravelry or Payhip) and Denise is offering two 100g skeins to make the pattern chosen!

A collage of photos and designs from Studio TwentyTwo

+

skeins of brightly colored yarn are piled on a wooden surface

Make sure you check out Janet’s designs here: Studio TwentyTwo on PayHip
and, of course, Denise’s yarns here: Voie de Vie Yarns

(Ships to USA only)

Thank you both for teaming up to bring this wonderful prize to the UMAL!


Nancy Murrell from YarnDatabase.com has generously donated a project bag of the winer’s choice from AmeliaXJoy on Etsy! (Up to $60 USD in value)
Click here to check out the bags: Ameliaxjoy Etsy Shop

8 project bags - a screenshot of the Etsy Listings from Ameliaxjoy on Etsy

This prize ships to USA or UK winners; if the winner drawn is from a country Amelia does not currently ship to (or shipping will be exorbitant) Nancy has a back-up solution as well and the winner will be able to chose from a bag maker closer to their home.

Please make sure you check out http://www.yarndatabase.com too!
“This searchable, sortable site is designed to help you keep track of your favorite designers and dyers across platforms, and find new favorites. It tracks knit and crochet designers, spinning fiber dyers and makers, and yarn spinners and dyers. You mark your favorites, and I’ll keep them up to date.

It’s a different approach than a pattern directory, more in keeping with “slow fashion” and building a community of makers. It de-emphasizes popularity algorithms in favor of finding makers you love.”


If you didn’t get to see May’s  prize post, or didn’t win what you had your eye on, make sure you go back and check out the Uplift Make Along May Sponsors Post to discover some more amazing makers!

Uplift Make Along May Prize Winners

I won’t make excuses – I’m 2 weeks late posting winners. There’s reasons, but for now let’s get to what you really want to see: if you won a prize in the most recent Uplift Make Along month of prizes! If you are listed below as a winner, please email UpliftMakeAlong AT gmail DOT com so you can be put in contact with the prize sponsor.

Winners for these prizes have been selected from posts made during the month of May using the “Finished Object” topic tag in the Mighty Network for the Uplift Makealong as well as from FOs posted with the #UpliftMakeAlong hashtag on Instagram. A random number generator is used to select winners, and they are then matched with prizes that fit the craft they use and the location they are in.

If you didn’t win, don’t worry – the sponsors have lovely products in their shops! You can always snag the skein of yarn or notion you wanted.


Lazy Sunday Yarns
wants to “add a little magic to your knitting!” with some fantastic yarn and stitch marker prizes!

Three skeins of hot pink speckled yarn lay on a white background Three stitch markers lay on a white background with small resin shapes in the background

Winner: Nannakaz.Creations on IG (IG project post link: Slemmish Thistle Cowl by @LaboursofLoveCrochetFirst is a skein of “Persephone” on a 75/25 Merino/Nylon base with an adorable “self love spell jar” stitch marker. Kay let me pair these up as I chose and I couldn’t resist the thought of pairing Persephone with “self-love!”

 

Three red, brown, cream variegated skeins of yarn lie on a white background with a matching crystal in the upper right hand cornerTwo crescent moon stitch markers with heart-accented lobster clasps lie on a white background with small resin pieces

Winner: Daniela Parra (Mighty Network project post link: Bloem by Jessica McDonaldThis second set is “Ludo,” on a 75/25 Merino/Nylon base and a “resin cast moon” stitch marker. The moon seemed like a perfect match for a Labyrinth-inspired skein of yarn!

If you love these yarns and markers, be sure to check out Kay’s shop here: Lazy Sunday Yarns Etsy Shop and Instagram here: Lazy Sunday Yarns Instagram

Both these sets ship worldwide! Thank you so much, Kay!


Voie de Vie
design + craft = an artful way of life

Denise has donated a variety of prizes that you’ll be seeing here and next month as well!

First up is a 100g skein of yarn (winner’s choice) from the Voie de Vie shop! Check out this beautiful photo Denise sent:
skeins of brightly colored yarn are piled on a wooden surface

Winner: Cathleen Fry (Mighty Network project link: Leaf Line Shawl by Shannon Squire Designs)( This prize ships to the USA only) The winner will be able to choose from yarns that are currently available – you might want to go start looking now! There’s so many lovely colors to choose from – i’m partial to the Day Lilies colorway myself.

Check out the Voie de Vie Big Cartel shop here for more yarns, totes, art boxes, subscription clubs, and more: Voie de Vie Big Cartel You’ll also want to follow on Instagram to see all the cool new colors and products Denise creates: @denisevoiedevie

Thank you for your generosity and participation in the event, Denise!


Tosha Kappus is an event participant who has kindly offered some extremely gorgeous yarns from stash to help support the event. I’ve been so amazed by the love that participants have shown this event so far! Thank you, Tosha, for parting with some of your gorgeous yarns to help encourage designers and makers!

Winner: IG Post by @Lucys.needlecrafts (IG project post link: Koi Pond Cowl by Gamer Babe KnitsFirst up are these three skeins of Knit Picks Tuff Puff! Holy cow, when I tell you my eyes can’t stop looking at this gorgeous pink I mean it! The colorway is “Pucker” and I can see why! This is a super bulky 100% wool yarn with 44 yards/100 gram ball.


Winner: @Iffer_eatsandknits on IG (IG project post link: Bad Wolf Bay Socks by @RuthBraschNext is 1 skein of Redhead Fibers SW Merino/Nylon in Toxic Waste. This is a fingering weight yarn with 436 yards/100 grams.  Check out that epic green!


Winner: Nikii Murtagh (Mighty Network project link: Split Decision Hat by Shanalines Designs)Third is 1 skein of Expression Fiber Arts Resilient Sock in Sweets. This is a fingering weight 100% SW Merino wool yarn with 440 yards/115 grams.

These three photos listed above ship to the USA only.

Tosha is on Instagram as @tknits if you’d like to see some beautiful yarn, English paper piecing, knitting, and more!
Thank you, Tosha, for donating to the UMAL!


If you didn’t get to see April’s prize post, or didn’t win what you had your eye on, make sure you go back and check out the Uplift Make Along April Sponsors Post to discover some more amazing makers!

Stash Enjoyment Granny Square

4 granny squares lie on a stone background. They vary signifcantly in color

One of my themes this year has been to enjoy the yarn that i’ve already purchased in the past and to be more intentional about my purchasing (you can read more about that in my post here, or by searching “stash enjoyment” in my blog search bar). Have I been 100% successful at it? Nope! This project, however, has brought me lots of joy and allowed me to use up lots of scraps & partial skeins of yarn, which I’ve enjoyed a lot.

Because this square is about enjoying your stash, it’s possible to work it up in either dk weight held single, or with two strands of fingering weight held together. You can even use both in one square – I have!

This pattern is for the squares as written in this post. At my gauge it comes out to about 8″x8″ (20 cm x 20 cm), which is what sizing and yardage estimates (below) are based on. If you use a larger hook/thicker yarn or smaller hook/thinner yarn, your yarn requirements will change.

If you prefer to learn by video, there is a start-to-finish YouTube video for this square here: Link to Stash Enjoyment Tutorial Video

If you want the ad-free PDF, which includes help choosing when to change colors, you can find it on:
Etsy
PayHip
Ravelry (warning, opens to the New Ravelry. Click with caution):


Materials
– 4.5 mm crochet hook, or size needed to achieve a gauge you are comfortable with
– Yarn (see below)

Yardage required per square: approximately 34g of yarn. The sample squares use a combination of dk yarn held single and fingering weight yarn held double. 1 square requires approximately 70 yds (64 m) of dk weight yarn, or 150 yds (137 m) of fingering weight yarn.

Blanket Sizing & Squares Needed

Size Size (Inches) Size (cm) Square Layout Total Square Count
Stroller 32 x 32 81 x 81 4 x 4 16
Baby/Child 40 x 40 100 x 100 5 x 5 25
Throw 56 x 64 140 x 160 7 x 8 56
Twin Bed 72 x 96 180  x 240 9 x 12 108
Full Bed 96 x 96 240 x 240 12 x 12 144
Queen Bed 104 x 104 260 x 260 13 x 13 169
King Bed 112 x 112 280 x 280 14 x 14 196

 

Yarn Required

­Size Yds/M (Fingering) Yds/M (DK) Total Grams (both)
Stroller 2,377 yds / 2,173 m 1,257 yds / 1,149 m 544
Baby/Child 3,715 yds  / 3,396 m 1,964 yds / 1,795 m 850
Throw 8,321 yds / 7,605 m 4,398 yds / 4,020 m 1,904
Twin Bed 16,047 yds / 14,667 m 8,482 yds / 7,753 m 3,672
Full Bed 21,396 yds / 19,556 m 11,310 yds / 10,337 m 4,896
Queen Bed 25,110 yds / 22,951 m 13,276 yds / 12,134 m 5,746
King Bed 29,122 yds  / 26,618 m 15, 394 yds / 14,070 m 6,664

**Yardage requirements are estimated off yarn that is 437 yds / 400 m per 100g for fingering weight and 231 yds / 211 m per 100g for dk weight.

Notes
– Since you may choose to join colors as you please, I use “begin” as an instruction for starting a round.
“Begin” with a new color means to put a slip knot on your hook and act as if your yarn has been joined the entire time.
“Begin” without a new color means to slip stitch to the indicated stitch, which is usually the center of the corner.

– A number before a stitch (eg: 3dc) means to work all those stitches in the same indicated stitch. In this example you would work 3 double crochets in the same stitch.

– A number after a stitch (eg: dc 3) means to work one of that type of stitch in each of the next stitches indicated. In this example you would work 1 double crochet in each of the next 3 stitches.

Yarn used per round                                       
Round 1: 1 g
Round 2: 1 g
Round 3: 2 g
Round 4: 3 g
Points after Round 4: 1g each, 4g total
Round 5: 2g
Round 6: 6 g
Round 7: 4 g
Round 8: 4 g
Round 9: 3 g
Round 10: 4 g


Stitches Used
(see video tutorial if you are unsure about stitch placement)

Ch = Chain
Ch Sp = Chain Space; the space created by a number of chains in the previous row/round.
CSDC = Chainless Standing Double Crochet:  https://youtu.be/XFK1tTRBugQ
Dc = Double Crochet
3dc Cluster = a group of 3 dc in one space
FPDC = Front Post Double Crochet
FPTR = Front Post Treble Crochet
Magic Ring = a cinchable circle to begin a motif (see tutorial video)
PS = Puff Stitch: (yo, insert hook, yo, pull up loop) x4, yo, pull through all 9 loops on hook.
Sc = Single Crochet
Sl St = Slip Stitch
Sp = Space


Pattern

Make a magic ring. Ch 2, dc 12 in the ring. Join with sl st to first dc of round. (12 dc, counts as Round 1)

Round 2: (CSDC, dc) in first dc, 2dc in each dc around. Join with sl st to first dc of round. (24 dc)

Round 3: Pull the current loop on your hook up to the height of a double crochet, PS in the first dc, ch2, (skip next dc, PS in next dc, ch 2) around, join with sl st to top of first PS of round. (12 PS, 12 ch-2 spaces)

Round 4 : Begin in any ch-2 sp. **(3dc, ch 2, 3dc, ch 1) in any ch-2 sp, [(3dc, ch 1) in next ch-2 sp] twice** repeat from ** to ** three more times. Join with a sl st to first dc of round. Break yarn.

Granny corners (worked in flat rows):
R1:
with WS facing up, begin working in the ch-1 sp directly to the left of any corner. 3dc, ch 1, (3dc in next ch-1 sp) twice. Turn. (3 clusters of 3 dc)

R2: Ch 1, sl st to next ch-1 sp, sl st in that space, (CSDC, 2dc) in same space, ch 1, 3 dc in next ch-1 sp. Turn. (2 clusters of 3dc)

R3: Ch 1, sl st to next ch-1 sp, sl st in that space, (CSDC, 2dc) in same space. Cut yarn.

Repeat R1-3 above until you have all 4 corners worked.

Begin working in the round again

Round 5 : Begin in the center DC of any corner point, **3sc, sc, (ch 3, sc in corner of next 3dc cluster) x6** repeat from ** to ** three more times. Join with sl st to first sc of rnd. (48 sc, 24 ch-3 sp).

Round 6: Begin in center sc of the corner point, **3dc, dc2, (3 dc in ch-3 sp, dc in next sc) x6, dc in next sc** Repeat from ** to ** three more times. Join with sl st to first dc of rnd. 124 dc. Cut yarn if switching colors.

Round 7: Begin in center dc of any corner **3sc, sc2, FPTR, (sc 3, FPTR) x6, sc 3** Repeat from ** to ** three more times. Join with sl st to first sc of rnd. (96 sc, 28 FPTR).

Round 8: Begin in center sc of the corner point,**(sc, FPDC, sc) in center st of corner, (sc 3, DC Post) x7, sc 3** Repeat from ** to ** three more times. Join with sl st to first sc of rnd. (104 sc, 32 FPDC).

Round 9: Begin in center post st of corner **(sc, ch 2, sc) in corner dc post st, ch 1, sk 1, (sc, ch 1, sk 1) to next corner** repeat from ** to ** three more times. Join with sl st to first sc of rnd.

Round 10: Begin in ch-1 sp of any corner **(sc, ch 1, sc) in corner ch-1 sp, (dc post on dc post 2 rows down, ch 1, sc in ch-1 sp, ch 1) x8, dc post on dc post 2 rows down, ch 1** repeat from ** to ** three more times. Join with sl st to first sc of rnd. Cut yarn.

 

Uplift Make Along May Prize Sponsors

It’s month two of the Uplift Make Along, a three month event created to support and bring visibility to designers who aren’t “famous” (yet!) in the fiber arts design community.

Some wonderful makers have generously donated prizes for the event participants (which could include you) – so here they are!

Winners for these prizes will be selected from posts made during the month of May using the “Finished Object” topic tag in the Mighty Network for the Uplift Makealong as well as from FOs posted with the #UpliftMakeAlong hashtag on Instagram. A random number generator is used to select winners, and they are then matched with prizes that fit the craft they use and the location they are in.

Please check out the prize sponsors below – check out their shops too if you just can’t wait to see if you won the prize!


Lazy Sunday Yarns
wants to “add a little magic to your knitting!” with some fantastic yarn and stitch marker prizes!

Three skeins of hot pink speckled yarn lay on a white background Three stitch markers lay on a white background with small resin shapes in the background

First is a skein of “Persephone” on a 75/25 Merino/Nylon base with an adorable “self love spell jar” stitch marker. Kay let me pair these up as I chose and I couldn’t resist the thought of pairing Persephone with “self-love!”

 

Three red, brown, cream variegated skeins of yarn lie on a white background with a matching crystal in the upper right hand corner

Two crescent moon stitch markers with heart-accented lobster clasps lie on a white background with small resin pieces

This second set is “Ludo,” on a 75/25 Merino/Nylon base and a “resin cast moon” stitch marker. The moon seemed like a perfect match for a Labyrinth-inspired skein of yarn!

If you love these yarns and markers, be sure to check out Kay’s shop here: Lazy Sunday Yarns Etsy Shop and Instagram here: Lazy Sunday Yarns Instagram

Both these sets ship worldwide! Thank you so much, Kay!


Voie de Vie
design + craft = an artful way of life

Denise has donated a variety of prizes that you’ll be seeing here and next month as well!

First up is a 100g skein of yarn (winner’s choice) from the Voie de Vie shop! Check out this beautiful photo Denise sent:
skeins of brightly colored yarn are piled on a wooden surface
( This prize ships to the USA only) The winner will be able to choose from yarns that are currently available – you might want to go start looking now! There’s so many lovely colors to choose from – i’m partial to the Day Lilies colorway myself.

Check out the Voie de Vie Big Cartel shop here for more yarns, totes, art boxes, subscription clubs, and more: Voie de Vie Big Cartel You’ll also want to follow on Instagram to see all the cool new colors and products Denise creates: @denisevoiedevie

Thank you for your generosity and participation in the event, Denise!


Tosha Kappus is an event participant who has kindly offered some extremely gorgeous yarns from stash to help support the event. I’ve been so amazed by the love that participants have shown this event so far! Thank you, Tosha, for parting with some of your gorgeous yarns to help encourage designers and makers!


First up are these three skeins of Knit Picks Tuff Puff! Holy cow, when I tell you my eyes can’t stop looking at this gorgeous pink I mean it! The colorway is “Pucker” and I can see why! This is a super bulky 100% wool yarn with 44 yards/100 gram ball.


Next is 1 skein of Redhead Fibers SW Merino/Nylon in Toxic Waste. This is a fingering weight yarn with 436 yards/100 grams.  Check out that epic green!


Third is 1 skein of Expression Fiber Arts Resilient Sock in Sweets. This is a fingering weight 100% SW Merino wool yarn with 440 yards/115 grams.

These three photos listed above ship to the USA only.

Tosha is on Instagram as @tknits if you’d like to see some beautiful yarn, English paper piecing, knitting, and more!
Thank you, Tosha, for donating to the UMAL!


If you didn’t get to see April’s prize post, or didn’t win what you had your eye on, make sure you go back and check out the Uplift Make Along April Sponsors Post to discover some more amazing makers!

Uplift Make Along April Sponsors (Part 1)

The Uplift Make Along is in full swing! So far it’s been a great time of discovering new designers, exploring the Mighty Network together, and dipping our toes into the pool of the event.

This first sponsor post has been a long time coming because makers keep offering prizes (and because my computer intermittently decides to stop working)! I waited until I have all the current prize donations logged so I can divide them up evenly between months as well as prizes that ship in the USA only vs internationally. Please note that these shipping restrictions are at the discretion of the sponsor, specified when they donated the prize.

  • Winners for these prizes will be drawn via random selection (Random Number Generator [RNG] for Mighty Networks posts with the “Finished Object” topic tag, and either an RNG or hashtag chooser for Instagram posts of Finished Projects for the event using the #UpliftMakeAlong hashtag.
  • Winners will be instructed to contact the donor with their shipping details. If the donor does not receive an email within 1 week, another winner will be drawn via the same method as above.

Without further ado, here are the Prize Sponsors for April!
Sponsor’s businesses (if they are a business) can be found by clicking on their name at the top of their post.


Holly Press Fibers

skeins of yarn in the back of a translucent white square with black text reading "Uplift Make Along Prize Sponsor: Holly Press Fibers. Winner's choice of one in-stock sock set. #UpliftMakeAlong. www.hollypressfibers.com

(Shipping to USA + Canada Only)


Fiber Swag

6 wood etched stitch markers labeled: In a clockwise direction, starting at the top left: "Sheepicorn," "Sheepsquatch," "The Sheepken," "Medusheep," "Mersheep," "Pegasheep"

(Ships to USA only – 1 set each to 3 winners)
Description from maker: Available as outlines or shaded.

These hand crafted stitch markers will help you keep track of your place in your next knit or crochet project. Each light weight wooden stitch marker measures 1 inch in diameter. The closed metal ring measures just over 8 mm in diameter, fitting comfortably on up to a size 10 (US) knitting needle. The metal ring is a snag free, soldered jump ring. Alternatively, these can be made with a lobster clasp that will fit over a size 5 (US) knitting needle or a larger lobster claw that will fit over a size 11 (US) knitting needle.


Over the Moon Yarn

Plastic ice cream cone stitch marker on a background of multicolored sprinkles Two knit hats designed to look like ice cream cones lay on a white background, demonstrating the "Ice Scream" pattern by Over the Moon Yarns

Ships Worldwide – Ice Scream hat kit (knit)

Description from Maker:

An aran weight hat that looks like 3 scoops of ice cream melting down a waffle cone completed with a cherry on top pom pom.
The yarn is Asteroid Aran 100% superwash merino. The kit contains 1x 100g skein of aran and 3x 25g skeins of contrasting aran weight minis for your ice cream flavours. The kit is complete with red green and brown yarn to make the pompom on top.  Along with an acrylic space ice cream stitch marker and of course the pattern!

Dodo Beadworks

Two beaded stitch markers are clipped on a white hank of yarn. The left marker is a spiral, red/white/black pattern, the right marker is a frog who appears unamused to be a stitch marker!

Ships Worldwide – Stitch Marker Set

Description from maker: I offer two types of progress keepers in my shop so I thought it would be fun to offer a prize package that included one of each: one peyote stitched Bead Tube Progress Keeper with Black, White, and Cranberry Red Beads along with a brick stitched Green Frog Progress Keeper.

They were each created through a process of weaving tiny little glass beads to other tiny little beads over and over again to produce a progress keeper that’s as adorable as it’s lightweight.

Thank you, prize sponsors, for your generosity!
If you like what you see, you can check out the makers shops by clicking on their names – they have lots of wonderful products!
Remember you can join the Uplift Make Along in the Mighty Network or by using the Instagram hashtag #UpliftMakeAlong

Uplift Make Along

Are there fiber arts designers who don’t get the spotlight you think they deserve? Make one of their patterns and show it off! The Uplift Make Along is a online event created to celebrate and show off the work of independent knitting and crochet pattern designers. (<–YouTube Link to Barbara Benson’s video helping to define “Indie Designer”)

This event is not an anti “big-name designers,”  event, but it does focus on showcasing the work of up and coming, or less well known designers. These are designers that are working hard to create and sell professional quality patterns on a regular basis, but feel that they struggle to gain traction or could use a boost. The goal of this event is to uplift and support each other, not to complain about or put down those whose successful businesses have them in the current community spotlight.

Overview

Location
The Uplift Make Along will be hosted on a Mighty Network I’ve created (a link will be added once the network is made public) and Instagram. On Instagram use the hashtag #UpliftMakeAlong

Crafts Included: Knitting, Crochet, Tunisian Crochet

Important Dates

– Official Project Start:
April 1, 2021 (whatever time zone you’re in, if it’s April 1, you can start!)
– Event Ends: June 30, 2021 (end of the day wherever you are)

How does this event define whether a designer is well-known or not?

This event is not designed as a launchpad for brand new designers, nor is it a marketing course. The Uplift Make Along it is intended to create a space where makers can discover and showcase the work of designers who are publishing professional quality patterns with the intent of creating a profitable business.

With that goal in mind, I’ve decided that i’m not going to give you a specific list of requirements, but rather some things to think about:

Perceptions on social media and the reality of running a small business can be very different from each other. Perceptions =/= reality.

With that said, here’s some questions to ask yourself when choosing a pattern or designer to show off in this event.

  • Can you refer to the designer by their first name or business name only and others will immediately know who you mean? Consider choosing someone who’s less well-known.
  • Are you thinking of making that popular pattern you’ve seen a whole bunch of people making all over social media? Consider choosing one you think no one has seen before, or that is amazing and more people should see it!
  • Does this designer have 15k+ followers on social media? Consider choosing someone who has fewer so you can help boost their visibility.
  • The past year has seen lots of designers retire from selling their patterns. Are the designer’s patterns currently available for sale? If not, please choose someone whose are so you can help spotlight their work.

TL;DR: you can make any pattern by any designer. I trust that you will be keeping the “less known” part of designer spotlighting in mind when you choose. I will not be refereeing of whose patterns can be made or not made, or whether a designer is “too well known” to participate. We don’t know what is happening behind the scenes in anyone’s life or business.

 

FAQ

Are WIPs allowed? Yes, but if you’re working off a project started before April 1, 2021, the finished item won’t be entered into prize drawings.

Are there prizes? Yes, some. The goal of this event is to uplift designers, connect designers with makers, and uplift each other. But, sometimes a little yarn or pattern prize doesn’t hurt too, right? I’m thankful that some very generous makers have offered to donate prizes so we can thank you for participating and supporting independent designers. A separate sponsor post will be created that will detail the prizes and how they’ll be given out.

Do I have to use a “paid for” pattern? Please use a pattern from a designer who is primarily creating self-published, paid-for patterns (If you’re not sure what that means, scroll up and watch the video in which Barbara Benson helps to define an Indie Designer). You can use a pattern you already own, you could use one that was gifted to you, or you could explore the designer intros and find a new pattern.

What is Mighty Networks?
Mighty Networks is just what it sounds like – a platform that allows for the creation of public or private networks. Think of it like the “create a post” feature of Facebook + the privacy of Slack, and more!

In this case, i’ve created a network specifically for the Uplift Make Along. Here’s a few features I’m really excited about:

1. Designers and makers will be able to label themselves by their specialties! This means if you’re a knitting designer, you can label yourself that way. Tunisian crocheter only? You can add that if you’d like! This will help makers find designers who create their desired type of patterns and let other makers know about your favorite skill!

2. The ability to add geographic location (optional)
I don’t know about you, but sometimes it feels like being a fiber arts designer or maker is pretty lonely. Sometimes just knowing that others are near you and doing the same thing can help! This isn’t intended to be evasive or specific (I actually ask that you please NOT be specific about your exact location), but more of maybe a town/state/province/country type of thing. OR you can choose not to add this at all – it’s completely up to what you feel comfortable with.

3. Topic Tags!
Have you ever come upon a make along and wished you could find ONLY the knitting posts or ONLY the crochet posts, or ONLY the finished objects? Topic tags will allow you to do that! Designer introductions will also get a special topic tag so you can scroll through just designer intros and learn about a bunch of new designers!

 

How can I join in as a designer?

– Head over to the Mighty Network (Link) Once there, you will find instructions to create your introductory post. Designer intros will have a special tag on them that allows makers to click directly to them and scroll through only intro posts; It’ll be a gallery of designers to explore!

– Join in the Instagram challenge and/or interact with makers on the Network. This is an important one. Knitters and crocheters will be making your pattern with the goal of showing it off to help your business. Let’s show them our appreciation by helping to make this an amazing event and by joining right in with them.

– Join in as a maker. Make a design by another designer that you want to uplift!
Can you make your own pattern? Yes, but it’s not in the spirit of the event. As designers, we self-promote all the time (and there will be a self-promo portion of the event), but this event is focused on showing off someone else’s work and trusting that others will show off yours.

– Promote the Make Along to your audience. Use your social media, newsletter, podcast, or whatever way you prefer to talk to your people to reach out and let them know the Make Along is happening. Encourage them to check out the hashtags, chat, and take advantage of the Mighty Network to  discover new designers that they love and connect with fellow makers!

– Post once per week in the self promo group. This will be the place for you to highlight a pattern that needs some love, a new pattern release that has just been published, etc. More details about this will be given in the network.

 

How can I join in as a maker?

Come on over to the Mighty Network, or join on Instagram by using the hashtag #UpliftMakeAlong
– Choose a knitting, crochet, or Tunisian crochet pattern by a designer you think needs more visibility and to have their work shown off. It can be one of the designers who has created an intro post, or one you know of that you’d like to uplift! Make their pattern, then post about it on the Mighty Network site or Instagram and let people know who the designer is and why you love this project so much!

– Join in the Instagram challenge! I’ll be posting weekly prompts to help you share designers you love, discover new favorites, and show off your work.

This post will be updated when the network goes public and if/when event updates are made. This is a new event, so tweaks and changes are bound to happen.

 

Knitting and Crochet Pattern Pricing

 

the point of a crocheted lace shawl is laid on a wood background. The lace is blue and green with leaf and triangle motifs, with yellow stripes at the top of the photo
I-95 shawl by Ruth Brasch

Pattern pricing is a common topic of discussion among knitting and crochet designers. Recently a friend who predominantly designs knitting patterns asked me, as a knitting and crochet designer, “how much will crocheters pay for patterns?”

It’s a good question. As with any industry, there are some biases and stereotypes in this question. The bias in question is whether crocheters are less willing to pay an appropriate price for a pattern than knitters.

I jadedly answered her that crocheters will fuss over paying more than $5 USD for a pattern, but decided to challenge my own cynicism by asking my Instagram followers “how much would you pay for a crochet pattern” on one slide, with an open box to type an answer, and the next slide asked the same question for knitting patterns.

**Note: at this point I know at least some of you are considering the fact that my test pool is small, likely has a demographic bias within it, also likely has a socioeconomic bias within it, and hypothetical answers are very different than documented sales. Yes. I know this – keep reading!

While the answers typically ranged from $6-10 USD for both knitting and crochet patterns, what I found more interesting than the actual prices listed were the messages that showed up regarding the slides. Questions were raised and comments made about budgeting, knowing the value of a pattern (how do you know if a designer is a good one?), conversion rates for non-USA buyers, socioeconomic status of purchasers, “pay what you can” business models, and more! These questions and comments are what i’m going to attempt to address in this blog post, which may possibly turn into a series of blog posts.

For Context:
In this post, I am speaking specifically about independently published digital knitting and crocheting patterns. Designers who create these are colloquially referred to as “Indie Designers.” For more about what an indie designer is or does, I recommend Barbara Benson’s video which addresses that very question.

I am also speaking specifically about designers who are working at a professional level. That means the work they publish is on par with current industry standards: as error free as possible, well fitting, garments graded into an appropriate size range, professionally edited, etc. If you want to know more about what goes into the creation of a professionally created knitting or crochet pattern, I recommend this blog post. Go read it, then come back.

If you’re going to read the post later, just know the author estimates that

It can take anywhere from 53.1-113.65 hours and beyond to produce a quality sweater knitting pattern.

Please keep that number in mind, as well as the fact that Indie Designers are also their own publicists, marketers, social media wranglers, and customer support department.

Let’s begin addressing objections I received to pattern prices higher than $6-10 USD (or in some cases higher than $5 USD)

 

Objection 1: Money is tight (designers shouldn’t raise their prices because i’m on a budget)

Yes. For many, money is tight right now. A global pandemic certainly hasn’t helped the situation and there are lots of people who are on very tight budgets. That does not, however, mean that designers should not get paid for their work.

I feel that I have a right to speak to this response specifically because for years I was living well below the poverty line in a large city. I budgeted very tightly, saved up,  and chose yarns that were within my budget (hellooo $1.25 sale yarn from a large chain store).

For patterns, I helped designers test patterns, utilized free patterns from websites like Knitty  (who, by the way, pay their contributing designers so they can provide a “free” pattern. “Free,” in this case, means free to the consumer, not free to the designer), and learned to improvise my own designs out of stitch dictionaries from local libraries.

I empathize with with seeing cool patterns or gorgeous yarns and thinking that I would like to be able to buy and use them but not being able to.

Along with my own life experience above, I’ve also noticed this argument seems to believe that designers are not in need of the income they make from pattern design; that they are simply creating patterns for the joy of it and hoping to make a little money on the side. While I’m not going to delve into the numerous biases in that assumption, I’ll just remind you i’m addressing professional pattern design. Designers who create as part of a business, who frequently depend on the income their designs generate. Requiring designers to maintain low, unsustainable prices for the sake of potential customers is actually excluding a number of designers (or potential designers) within that same demographic from furthering their careers.

So, the “I won’t pay because i’m on a budget” is fine. I’ve listed how I coped with budgeting above, perhaps some of those ideas will help others. I’m not fine, however, with castigating designers for raising prices or attempting to be paid a fair wage for highly skilled work.

Objection 2: I’ve bought patterns before that are full of errors. How do I know i’m purchasing from a “good” (professional) designer?

This is a question where i’m going to step on some toes (if you had any toes left from the first objection section). I’d like to first state that if a pattern is, indeed, “full” of errors, it is not being technically edited and then corrected in a professional manner. I, too, have had the experience of expecting that I would receive a professional pattern when I made a purchase and then finding it to be full of errors! Those designers I tend to avoid purchasing from again.

So how can a customer know the pattern will be a “good” one? How can they know they’ll get a pattern that’s worth paying for and how can designers communicate to their customers that they’re producing quality patterns?

This question/objection is essentially discussing a risk vs reward ratio, which is an economics concept. Since I like graphics, here’s a few visuals for you! They’re not perfect or exhaustive, but hopefully they’ll help!

(c) 2021 Ruth Brasch

The graphic above is one I created, but it represents the general concept of risk vs reward. In general, low risk brings low reward. Eg: free patterns might be full of errors, but you’re ok with that because you didn’t pay for them. Conversely, in theory, high risk should bring a high reward… right?

Check out the next graphic.

(c) 2021 Ruth Brasch

This graphic is more specific to the fiber arts community.
The red dot represents what many purchasers indicate they want : a low cost/low risk pattern that is guaranteed to be excellently produced and published. No errors, the maker’s project comes out looking like the designer’s etc.

The blue dot represents what makers have indicated they are wary of: purchasing a pattern from a designer at high risk to themselves. That risk could be a high monetary cost, an unknown designer, no indicator that the pattern will come out like the sample, or all of the above.

Customers are much more likely to go with the red dot than the blue one, because who doesn’t like low risk and high reward? The problem with this is that this is a risk vs reward assessment for customers, not for designers.

Risks for designers include the financial and time output in the creation of the pattern, the risk of “pricing out” of the current market by pricing too high, appearing to be a low value/novice designer by pricing too low, and more.

So, what’s the solution?

“Solution” 1 (it’s not a solution from me, and i’ll tell you why!): the “pay what you can” method

The “pay what you can” philosophy touts itself as both “inclusive” (for those who are at a lower income level, or on a tighter budget, for whatever reason), and as giving value to the work of artists by giving them a way to price their work at the level it deserves. Pay what you can typically looks like this:
– The sweater pattern is priced at $15. Please pay this if you can afford it, it’s the realistic price of this pattern.
– Discount coupon level 1: Use this coupon to purchase the pattern at $12 – the high end of the current going rate for garment design
– Discount coupon level 2: Use this coupon to purchase the pattern at $9 if you are in need of the discounted price.
– Discount coupon level 3: Use this coupon to purchase the pattern at $7 if you are in need of the discounted price.

Problems with the pay what you can model:

1)It indicates that the lower prices are acceptable compensation for the designer’s work. While the lower prices are intended for those who are struggling financially,  it still is an available price. No other business runs this way! You don’t walk into a store, make your purchases, and when the total rings up at the register say “oooh, shoot, that’s a little high, can you just lower the price for me a tad? I’d rather pay less.” If you can’t afford the price at the register, you put items back.

This is an example at a retail store. We aren’t talking about mass-produced retail items or necessities like food or water, this is skilled art that is being created by professionals and subsequesntly devalued.

2)Many designers who utilize this method of pricing are actually raising their prices, not making the more accessible. It’s a red herring virtue signal for some (ducks for cover, expecting knitting needles to be thrown), and a genuine (if misguided) attempt at inclusion from others. If you look at the prices above, the $15 price is approximately 30-40% higher than the current market value for a sweater design. You’d expect the low end to be lower by a similar percentage to be “accessible” wouldn’t you? But no, the “accessible” end of this pricing scheme is often just the current market value of patterns, or possible just $1 USD lower.

That’s not accessible, that’s a false pretense of accessibility while actually raising prices.

If you’re going to raise your prices, JUST RAISE THEM.

 

What’s a real solution, Ruth?

Designers, you need to be less of a risk. Not by lowering your prices, but by providing ways that customers can see you’re providing quality work, AND you need to point it out to them. Some ways to do this include:

1)Post reviews and testimonials. Has someone just given you great feedback about one of your patterns? Ask if you can share it publicly on your website. Cite them as the maker, note which pattern was made, and how they enjoyed it.This helps makers know that your pattern is, indeed, enjoyable and clear.

Makers: go look for reviews! Check out a designer’s website or social media hashtags – what are people saying about their designs? Reviews are especially helpful in light of the current migration away from Ravelry.

Ravelry’s project pages have been a huge help to designers and makers alike in the sense that they show that the pattern works, help makers with color palette inspiration, and help potential customers know that a designer is putting out quality patterns that will fit! However, now that their site is inaccessible to many, designers and customers are looking for new ways to find and portray the value of patterns.

Testimonials and photos on your website can be a great way to create a similar effect.

2)Pattern testers! Do you have your patterns made by pattern testers before publication? Share their work!Pattern testing can also act as a secondary safety net. Some patterns can be technically sound in the written form, but they just look wonky on real live people. Successful pattern testing can help catch the wonkiness before publication and, when testing is completed, there are more well-fitting projects that can be a testimonial. This lowers the risk for your potential customer – they see the reward in front of them.

I know it’s not always possible and that testing isn’t a requirement, but it can be helpful if you’re hoping to reach out to new potential customers who haven’t made your patterns before.

Makers: look for projects! If it’s a new pattern, is the designer sharing photos or samples you can look at beyond their own?

3)Have 1-2 patterns in your catalog that are free. Not just throwaway/simple patterns, but good ones that show off your awesomeness and then remind your audience that they exist!

Makers: take advantage of these! Download the pattern, make the item, share photos! You’ll be able to get familiar with a designer’s writing and layout style and know who you’d like to purchase from in the future. The risk goes down!

 

The last objection i’m planning to torpedo is the “art should be free” objection, or “knitting patterns have traditionally been free with yarn.”

1. Go back up and watch Barbara’s video about indie designers if you haven’t already. Knitting patterns that are “free” with yarn or “free” online aren’t really free. If they’re put out by a yarn company, that yarn company has had to pay the designer in some way for publishing rights to the pattern. That yarn company then takes the pattern they’ve purchased the rights to, and uses it to induce you to buy their yarn.

2. “Art Should be Freeeeee” is bunk. Music isn’t free**. Paintings aren’t free. Books aren’t free. The only reason you think knitting and crochet patterns should be free or cheap is because of the above-mentioned, well-established expectation created by yarn and publication companies. Also, knitting and crochet have traditionally been seen as women’s work that is just an expectation/obligation and is therefore not valuable in a business setting.

Do you think housecleaning is worth paying for? Pattern design is too.

Do you think food you didn’t have to cook yourself is worth paying for? Pattern design is too.

Designers: put out good patterns, then be unabashedly bold in championing your own brilliance. Let people know your work is good!

Makers: do your homework before you buy! Check out a designer’s reputation and portfolio – don’t just impulse shop sales.

** Edit February 20, 2021: it’s been brought to my attention that music artists are facing similar issues in their industry. So while I say music isn’t free, the perception of music as free exists, and indie music artists are being pressured to put out more free content or accept less pay. Check out This article from 2019 about payment by streaming services such as Spotify for more information.

Stash Enjoyment 2021 – Making an Investment

A single skein on the left is blue with red and yellow sections. To the right, is a braid of mini skeins ranging from pale yellow, through purple, into blue. They are dyed by Gritty Knits, and are laying on a wooden backdrop.(Timebomb and timebomblets by Gritty Knits)

**This post is part of my series on using my yarn stash in 2021, and enjoying it! The first post of the series can be found here.**

When I made my initial Instagram post about starting Stash Enjoyment 2021, I got a comment I was expecting. The commenter told me not to feel badly about having a large stash because “it’s an investment and so good for your brain and soul.”

A large stash is an investment – no arguments there. It’s a financial investment, a spatial investment (cause you’ve got to put it all somewhere), an emotional investment (be honest – it is!), etc. But Stash Enjoyment 2021 is also about making an investment- an investment in the person you want to be in the future.

I’m not here to condemn people for buying yarn. I (obviously) love buying yarn. My goal Stash Enjoyment goals are not to shame others – they’re to motivate me and help me remind myself that I want to be able to feel like i’m the boss of my stash and not the other way around.

Buying yarn, especially indie dyed yarn, is also an investment into small businesses, often owned by women. A large portion of my current yarn stash is indie dyed and part of my past purchasing motivation has been that I want to help these small, women-owned businesses off the ground. But I think we’ve created an illusion in this community. We’ve created an illusion that there is flourishing market with a large demand; that anyone can become a successful professional yarn dyer if they just work hard enough. Speaking as someone who worked hard at it, I can tell you there’s more to success in this industry than simply dyeing yarn and popping it on Etsy.

I want to make sure that i’m not perpetuating a cycle that actually traps women in the illusion that they can create a successful business in this industry, and all they have to do to achieve that dream is start off working horrendously long hours, bringing in a very low profit margin, and turning themselves into workhorses instead of artists who enjoy their process.

This topic has also made me re-think the way I approach pattern design and the way I interact with pattern designers. You know who works very hard for an unreliable wage and under average pay? Knitting and crochet designers.

So, if I’m at the point (which I am) where I acknowledge that my current business model is more of an expensive hobby that occasionally pays for itself, that means i’m going to design patterns based on what I want to make and what I enjoy, rather than attempting to design things I think will be marketable or will sell well.

How does this relate to stash enjoyment? Well, it means that i’m designing from stash instead of constantly buying more yarn because I think to myself, “well, someday i’ll turn this into a design! It’s a business investment!” I’m attempting to take a more realistic look at how many items I can comfortably finish in a month or year’s worth of making.

What about you? Are you pretty good at knowing how much you can make in a set period of time, or do you tend to fall into the “buy all the things and start all the projects” trap I do?

If this post resonates with you, or if you’re joining in on #StashEnjoyment2021 please use the hashtag or tag @ruthbrasch on social media when you interact or join in. You’ll be able to browse the #StashEnjoyment2021 hashtag to “meet” other makers who are also working from mindfully from stash and enjoying it!

Stash Enjoyment 2021 – Selling Contentment

a close up of part of a cable knit shawl in burnt orange. The shawl is "Feelin' Foxy" by Ruth Brasch

**This post is part of my series about using and enjoying the yarn and patterns you have. For more information, click the “Stash Enjoyment 2021” link below to read my original blog post.**

In preparing for Stash Enjoyment 2021, I’ve been reading the blogs of Felicia Semple. Her journey through what she calls “Stash Less” started in 2014, and Her blog posts about it are very enjoyable and enlightening. In one of them, she mentions that companies are Selling Discontent. Much of what she said resonated with me in this post; social media is especially good at “selling discontent.”

You know what else they do, though? The sell contentment. When you see a knitwear designer with a huge smile on her face as she dances across your Instagram feed in her newly completed sweater, the intent is to make you think “hmm, if I knit that sweater will I be as happy as she is?” You put down your sweater WIP and click through to the link to the kit she’s selling to see if it comes in your size and color preference, suddenly discontented with the project that you were enjoying a few moments earlier. I don’t mean to imply that small business owners are devious scoundrels out to fleece the innocent public with their swanky wares. Rather, I’m speaking to the way our minds perceive and interact with social media.

**pause**

Ask yourself these questions the next time this happens:
1. Do I NEED this kit, or do I WANT it?
If it’s a want, WHY do I want it? Is it FOMO? Is it shiny new project syndrome, in which I get that quick pleasure hit from starting something new?
2. Is this a project I can start right away? If not, how long will it have to sit before I can start it? If the answer is more than a week, I highly recommend that any of you participating in Stash Enjoyment 2021 click right back out of that site and go back to your WIP! That pattern will still be there when you have finished your current project.

If the pattern really resonates with you and you think it might be a project you’ll be able to start in a couple weeks or a month, my suggestion is that you find a way you can bookmark or save the link to those items. Here’s a couple suggestions:

  1. Make a Pinterest board! Pinterest is a super easy way to save website links with photos. You could create a board called “Stash Enjoyment 2021” for patterns you see during the year that you may want to make. I think you’ll be amazed how many of them there are vs how many actually get made!
  2. Use the bookmark function on your internet browser. You can usually create folders for bookmarks, so you could create a Stash Enjoyment 2021, or “patterns I want to make in the future” folder, or whatever you’d like to name it.
  3. Make a physical list. This could be as easy as keeping a list with a pen and paper. If I were to do it this way, I would likely keep the list posted somewhere I could easily see it so I don’t forget that I have projects I want to make. This is what I do with pattern designs I want to work on – I keep them listed on a white board that’s mounted on my kitchen door. Seeing a long list reminds me that I should work on some of the items on there before adding to the list. **BONUS** if you decide to use this technique, you’ll have a finite amount of space on the paper/board. That means you can only add so many items to the list without having to remove some to add more. It helps keep the number of them down!
  4. If you can still use Ravelry, you could always use their “queue” or “favorites” functions. However, I find that I very easily queue and favorite patterns as a way of showing the designers I like the pattern, and I tend to never actually go back and look at them. For me, the limited, physical list that hangs where I can see it is the most effective technique.
  5. Save it on Instagram. If you saw the pattern on Instagram, clicking the “save” button will help support the designer while also saving the pattern for your future use. Right now, Instagram values those “saves,” because it shows the algorithm you like it enough to come back to it.

Do you have a way you like to save projects or assess intent for making? Let me know!